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Why Your Restaurant, Office Building, Or Hotel Is Incomplete Without Art

art for hotels and restaurantsNeurobiologist Professor Semir Zeki and a team of fellow scientists at University College London scanned study participants’ brains while they viewed art. The results? Looking at art created a near-immediate reaction in participants’ brains, releasing the hormone and chemical dopamine. According to Genius Labs, dopamine boosts mood and increases overall happiness, improves memory and focus, helps you sleep, promotes creativity, and may even reduce the symptoms of chronic inflammation.

That’s not all art can do. Here are just a few of the reasons art for hotels and restaurants is an absolute must.

Art Evokes Beauty

Art evokes beauty. Whether that beauty is purely physical or emotional, intellectual, and spiritual depends on the viewer. Simply put–from an evolutionary perspective–we are drawn to aesthetically pleasing things. The natural world is filled with vibrant colors, intricate patterns, and elaborate displays. The peacock has a colorful, awe-inspiring tail that accounts for over 60% of its total body length and serves no function other than to be visually pleasing, according to Psychology Today.

Similarly, we are drawn to symmetry, ratios, and the golden rectangle because it evokes beauty and simplicity–and perhaps because all of these things can be found in nature. These patterns are evident in nature, throughout history, and remain popular today.

Art Improves Our Mental Well-Being

Top art advisors and art consultants weigh in: pretty much universally, art makes us feel better. According to British mindful living magazine Psychologies, observing art for hotels and restaurants or looking at art in the workplace reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol. What’s more, having art to view at work can help make you more productive. Art promotes focus, which–in turn–results in greater levels of productivity. “People who work in spaces that are decorated with art or plants are 17% more productive than those who work in spaces that are bare and functional,” according to a study by Exeter University’s School of Psychology.

Similarly, wall art in hospitals or assisted living facilities can help create a relaxing atmosphere. Not only does viewing art reduce cortisol levels, but it also rejuvenates and revives us the same way that a long walk in nature can.

Art Benefits Young Americans

Art in public buildings, like art for hotels and restaurants or art for museums and schools, packs tremendous benefits for young Americans. Observing and creating art leads to higher math and science scores. Japan, The Netherlands, and Hungary all rank well when it comes to students’ math and science performances; they also prioritize art education, making it a mandatory part of the curriculum.

Furthermore, a University of Arkansas study observed students’ reactions when visiting an art museum. Following the visit, students’ critical thinking skills increased by as much as nine to 18%! Plus, students who recently viewed art showed greater levels of empathy than their peers.

Art Helps Us Remember And Art Speaks Volumes

Fine art for hotels and restaurants can also serve other functions. Art with historic origins helps us remember times long past and/or gives us a glimpse into the ways people lived long ago. All art is a reflection of culture, society, and the times.

Similarly, it can be an expression of modern culture and politics as well. It is much more copacetic to have art for hotels and restaurants that may hint at unrest or heavily lean on particular themes than to openly hash it out with your customers or patrons. Art can be a subtle, socially acceptable means of expressing difficult ideas and emotions.

Art is a necessity. In 1959, Ernst Pete Fischer published The Necessity Of Art and cited art’s importance in changing and shaping the world as well as the “virtue of the magic inherent in it.” That remains true today. Art is important for its cognitive and stress-relieving benefits, its beauty, its impact on history and our youth, and the lasting effects of its “magical” properties.